Photolandscape
Landscape Photography by
John Eastwood ©2020

Capturing the Spirit of the North West Landscape

New Images added to the Gallery
4 New Images added to the Gallery - all limited to 25 signed and numbered archival prints

"Although I spend much of my time exploring the varied landscapes of the North West UK, I have never set out with the deliberate objective of documenting them through a camera lens. Nor have I sought to portray them as idyllic, dramatic or pastoral; though one could well apply such adjectives to these environments. What I do seek to convey in my landscape photography is a sense of the natural spirit and elemental nature of these places, their unique feeling of presence that goes beyond a sense of place and provides a fleeting glimpse of something other. In many ways each picture is a meditation and I hope some element of that spirituality is transmitted as you view my photography.

Many of my images are captured at first light and often in the early months of the year when the soft, low sun has an evocative and ethereal quality. My photographic techniques are entirely dependent on the available light and the actuality of the landscape. I do not seek to ‘re-enchant the land’ and the images you see are as I found them. Serendipity is integral to my work and as such the number of pictures I take and release as limited edition prints are infrequent and in many ways self-selecting."

John Eastwood is one of the leading British Fine Art Landscape Photographers, he exhibits regularly in public and commercial galleries and venues around the North West. His work has been reproduced widely in books, magazines and periodicals.

LATEST NEWS

New to the Gallery
Click on any of the thumbnail images below for a higher resolution image. Full images details and description can be found in the Image Gallery section.
The Way of Winter
The Way of Winter
The Watcher of the Morning Skies
The Watcher of the Morning Skies
At Stormy Point
At Stormy Point
On the Other Side
On the Other Side
Exhibition News
Owing to the Coronavirus Pandemic, exhibitions scheduled for The Parsonage in Didsbury, Manchester (August 2020) and at The Macc Art Lounge, Macclesfield have now been postponed. Updates and further exhibition announcements to follow...
Other News
A number of my images are being used by the Grosvenor Shopping Centre in Macclesfield to adorn the hoardings inside Castle Street Mall. Enlarged significantly to cover the full height of the walls, they provide a stunning and dramatic backdrop of local images for visitors to the Centre.
There are still a few remaining packs of The Didisburye Oracle - A pack of oracle / divination cards I created for Didsbury Arts Festival 2019 and to celebrate the centenary of the death of Fletcher Moss. The cards were also featured in a special exhibition for Heritage Open Days 2019. Published in a limited edition of 500 packs, each pack contains 42 cards and each card features one of my original photographic images. For further information about the oracle visit:
www.didsburyoracle.co.uk
Press Cuttings
Press cuttings and reviews have now been moved to a separate area of the site. Click the Press link on the navigation Menu Bar or use the following link Press
The images in the Gallery are available as 22.25" x 16.25" / 56.5cm x 41.25cm fine art archival prints. Every print comes in a limited edition of just 25 signed and numbered prints, prepared and printed by the artist. Click on any of the thumbnail images below to view in higher resolution.
On the Other Side
On the Other Side
The early morning light penetrates an old and overgrown, tangled tunnel of rhododendron, illuminating the pathway through the twisting branches towards the light on the other side. The image was taken in the Keg Woodlands at Compstall (near to Romiley and Marple, Cheshire).
At Stormy Point
At Stormy Point
Overlooking the Cheshire plain, the abrupt and elevated red sandstone ridge of Alderley Edge is a SSSI offering panoramic views across Cheshire to the Peak District and the distant Pennine hills. However, the Edge's tranquil beauty is much more than any of its vistas; it is a complex and magical tapestry of witches, wizards and myths, a labyrinth of ancient mines, and the thread of Ley Lines all interwoven into this remarkable landscape.
The Watcher of the Morning Skies
The Watcher of the Morning Skies
From high in the branches of a skeleton tree, a sole blackbird is silhouetted against the turbulent skies of a stormy winter's morning. The air is filled with optimistic song as the day dawns and the skies lighten.
The Way of Winter
The Way of Winter
The Way of Winter captures the magical sense of stillness in the drifting mist, scattered light and snow of an early February morning. The way over the stile into the stretching snow-cloaked fields - the way of winter.
From Shining Tor to Shutlingsloe
From Shining Tor to Shutlingsloe
Sorry the limited edition is now SOLD OUT
After heavy April showers had raced across the summit of Shining Tor, the distinctive profile of Shutlingsloe (Cheshire's 'Matterhorn' and its third highest peak) is suddenly and brilliantly illuminated by the stark, spring sun. Shining Tor is the highest point in modern Cheshire, offering views that can extend across the plains as far as North Wales and Snowdonia.
Boundary Edge
Boundary Edge
Taxal Edge divides the villages of Taxal and Kettleshulme, it is part of a north-south ridge that culminates at Shining Tor and forms a literal as well as an administrative boundary edge between the counties of Cheshire and Derbyshire. To the right of the Edge, Kettleshulme nestles snugly into the valley of Todd Brook set against the backdrop of another ridge formed by the Bow Stones, Sponds Hill, Charles Head and Blue Boar. This is an arresting, ancient and undulating landscape quilted by an intricate patchwork of fields and farms.
Seven Rays
Seven Rays
Light and mist are evocative partners. A December day and seven rays of early morning winter light penetrate the ancient woodland at Chadkirk, near to Marple and Romiley in Cheshire. These woodlands surround the chapel and holy well that mark what was once the ancient monastic cell of Saint Chad. Interestingly, the concept of ‘the light of the seven rays’ as depicted here has a powerful mystical significance in many religions and esoteric philosophies.
Defined by Water
Defined by Water
Nestled in marshes on a windswept peninsula between the mouth of the River Lune and Morecambe Bay, Sunderland Point is a small hamlet lying at the end of a causeway and dependent on tidal access. A single-track road crosses the tidal marsh to be covered by water twice a day at high tide. Once a thriving port, seaside resort and an artist community, Sunderland Point views at all points of the compass: South and East to Lancaster, the Bowland Fells and Fleetwood; North and West to the South Lakeland Fells and across to the Irish Sea. It is an isolated location defined by water, ever present and ever-changing.
Stairway
Stairway
An intriguing stairway emerges from a tiny inlet at Calf Sound on the Isle of Man and scrambles precariously up the rocks. With origin and destination mysterious and indeterminate, it appears ambiguous, liminal and symbolic. Much of the Manx landscape comprises a mixture of sedimentary and volcanic rocks, folded and faulted by millions of years of tectonic pressures. The colour and movement of the sea contrasts with the coastal landforms and they combine to shape a spectacular landscape often shrouded by drifting mists.
Windgather
Windgather
Windgather rocks is a dramatic, jutting gritstone crag overlooking the village of Kettleshulme and a landscape of 17th and 18th century field-walls and scattered farms on the Derbyshire / Cheshire border. Exposed to the elements and the prevailing westerly wind that lends the crag its elemental name, it offers an extensive panorma; Westwards to the whole of Manchester and Cheshire and eastwards to the Peak District. Formed from Chatsworth Grits, the fascinating geological rock formations are designated as a RIGS (Regionally Important Geological Site).
Reflections on the River
Reflections on the River
The River Goyt rises on the moors of Axe Edge near the Cat and Fiddle Inn, crosses the old boundary between Derbyshire and Cheshire to be joined by the Rivers Sett and Etherow before meeting with the River Tame at Stockport to form the River Mersey. Meandering through the pastoral and the post-industrial, the river has played a significant historical role in the development and transformation of the landscape we know. “For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever.” – ‘The Brook’, Alfred Lord Tennyson.
Ebb Tide
Ebb Tide
A cold, crisp late afternoon and set against the brooding backdrop of Conwy Mountain, the rich, soft glow of the winter light is reflected on the quiet sands of Deganwy beach and the ebbing tide at the mouth of the Conwy estuary. Lying across the water from the town of Conwy, Deganwy is part of an exceptional landscape and one of the few south-westerly facing beaches on the North Wales coast. This winter shoreline has a powerful sense of tranquillity and presence.
From Black Hill
From Black Hill
Snow simplifies and unifies the landscape in extraordinary ways de-familiarising the familiar. This view from the slopes of Black Hill near Whaley Bridge towards Shining Tor, the highest point in Cheshire, takes in a restless landscape carved by nature and man by geology and agriculture, time and transition. Ancient, weathered and flanked by escarpments there is a liminal feel to the area, a sense of landscape on the margin yet rooted in its history, a concealed pocket between town and peak sheltered by the physical landscape.
Confluence of Mountain Streams
Confluence of Mountain Streams
At the junction of Fair Brook and Upper Seal Clough on the northern slopes of Kinder Scout, the confluence of mountain streams amidst the richly mossed jumble of peat stained stones, provides a surprisingly idyllic meeting point in this often rugged and unrelenting landscape. There is a remarkable sense of presence and clarity as the soft and low, late September light catches the cascading waters.
Beside the Odin Mine
Beside the Odin Mine
At the foot of the 'Mother Hill', or 'Shivering Mountain' of Mam Tor, the remains of the crumbling and collapsed A625 road crosses a landslip and struggles down to Castleton. Here, beside the Odin Mine, the thick, swirling mist – a frequent visitor to the Hope Valley - is caught in the early morning, winter light. The scheduled ancient monument of the Odin Mine, the oldest documented mine in Derbyshire and one of the oldest lead mines in England, was mined by Romans, Saxons and Danes (the name clearly references the latter). It ceased production around 1870.
And So Begins the Journey
And So Begins the Journey
And so begins the journey; a woodland clearing, intersecting footpaths and an anonymous fingerpost amidst a carpet of fallen leaves and dense, decaying bracken. Deeply embedded in the mythology and story of the woods, such devices have long been used by poets, artists and writers to symbolise choice, chance and opportunity. The sense of journeying through autumn woods embodies something that is both evocative and contemplative, moments of reflection and solitude before taking decisions or actions.
Casting of Shadows
Casting of Shadows
A small, windswept plantation nestled between Castleton and Peak Forest in the Derbyshire Peak District, marks what was once Watts Grove Rake. The linear earthwork and rock cut remains run east to west for 1.5km along the south side of Eldon Hill. The rake is thought to be medieval, providing evidence for both the historical and technological development of what was once the extensive mining landscape of the Derbyshire Mineral Field. Theses unsettled areas of grassy hillocks and disturbed ground are fragments of man's quest for galena or lead ore, shadows of the past that are integral to the rugged nature and soul of the Derbyshire landscape.
The Woodland Below
The Woodland Below
A Place of legend, myth, drama and enchantment, the prominent wind-carved gritstone outcrop of The Roaches in the Staffordshire Peak Distrct is atmospheric and special in every sense. This picture was taken on an early morning in late September and captures the mist as it snakes slowly between the trees and creeps along the carpet of the Roaches woodland.
Sound, Mist & Sea
Sound, Mist & Sea
Calf Sound is a narrow and often turbulent strait dividing the mainland Isle of Man from the 618 acre island of the Calf of Man. The word 'calf' derives from the Old Norse word kalfr which means a small island lying next to a larger one. The Sound has a powerful and transcendent sense of isolation and tranquility. The continuous call of sea birds through curtains of mist and the background crash of waves against the jagged rocky contours engenders a profound and immediate sense of place.
A Sea of Possibilities
A Sea of Possibilities
The golden light of the breaking dawn and the crepuscular rays of the rising sun are reflected on the untroubled waters of the stretching bay. The wonder of morning light moving across the water’s surface conjures a sense of opportunity, a sea of possibilities. The picture was taken at daybreak on the Isle of Man looking across the bay from Port St Mary.
Windfall Light
Windfall Light
The evocative, early morning image captures escaping shafts of sunlight brushing aside the leaves in dense Cheshire woodland. The picture is an example of 'komorebi' a Japanese word describing sunlight streaming through trees for which there is no direct English equivalent. The title 'Windfall Light' is a dreamlike metaphor borrowed from Dylan Thomas's poem 'Fern Hill' describing the remembered magic of such light - ”And once below a time I lordly had the trees and leaves, Trail with daisies and barley, Down the rivers of the windfall light.”
A Chance of Showers
A Chance of Showers
The River Kinder cascades down from the peat moorland plateau of Kinder Scout, near Hayfield in the Derbyshire High Peak. A scrambling and picturesque descent, cascading over rocks towards Kinder Reservoir and its confluence with the River Sett at Bowden Bridge. Pictured here on a summer day in late July, as a weather front and dramatic, racing clouds heralded the onset of the day's forecast 'a chance of showers'.
Through Clough to Mountain
Through Clough to Mountain
Fair Brook lives up to its name, an exceptional and isolated stream-cut valley, cloaked by heather and bilberries on the northern edges of the iconic plateau of Kinder Scout. Here, as the early morning mists clear to reveal the impressive crags of Seal Edge and Fairbrook Naze, the late September sun lightens the tumbling brook that shepherds the magical course through clough to mountain.
Late October Afternoon
Late October Afternoon
Along the towpath of the Peak Forest Canal as it meanders by Kirk Wood at Chadkirk near Marple, Cheshire, the generous October light on the unruffled surface of the water provides a natural mirror and a striking perspective. The Trees that line the towpath can be seen reflected in the surface of the canal providing an almost surrealistic vision.
Awaiting the Wind
Awaiting the Wind
Awaiting the wind to disperse their seed, billowing clouds of cottongrass on the upland moors are a stunning summer spectacle as they carpet the blanket bogs and heaths with airy, white plumes. They are seen here carpeting Trer Ceiri on the Llyn Peninsula in North Wales against the backdrop of Snowdonia. Although technically a sedge rather than a grass, these herbaceous perennial plants are the county flower of Manchester and an enduring emblem of the wide open spaces and the long fight for the freedom of these wilderness areas.
Myths and Trees
Myths and Trees
Castleton, Derbyshire and in the foothills of Mam Tor and along the Hope Valley, low-lying cloud and wisps of early morning mist are illuminated and dispersed by the newly risen winter sun, creating a startling and evocative scene. Here a small grove of trees nestled between the Odin Mine and Blue John Cavern, appear almost encircled, by the swirling mist.
Across the Vale
Across the Vale
(Only the Artist Proof print number remaining)
Looking across the Vale of Edale from Kinder's rugged southern edge, a momentary glow of winter light penetrates the swirling cloud as thick morning mist drapes the Great Ridge. The Great Ridge bounds Edale to the South, and marks the transition between the gritstone moors and the limestone hills. In the valley below, Grindsbrook Clough, the original route of the Pennine Way, inches its way slowly up the slopes of Kinder, an iconic northern landscape that is both awesome and transcendent.
Weathering
Weathering
Sorry the limited edition is now SOLD OUT
From Edale an ascending zig-zag path leads up The Nab towards Ringing Roger and then onwards to Nether Tor and the edge of the wild Kinder plateau. Here, the sculptural forms of endlessly fascinating weathered and eroded gritstone rocks create an atmosphere that is both timeless and unmistakeably 'present'. The fantastic rocky skyline overlooks the Vale of Edale and provides a foreground towards the Great Ridge, Hollins Cross, Back Tor, Lose Hill and Win Hill.
One February Morning
One February Morning
Early one February morning on the northern edge of Kinder Scout, splinters of light penetrate the mist as sunlight enters the steeply shelving slopes of Middle Seal Clough. Beneath the towering crags of Seal Edge and the Seal Stones, the tributaries of the aptly named Fair Brook tumble from Kinder plateau in a succession of secret waterfalls that lie hidden between the boulders and the birch trees.
A Rite of Spring
A Rite of Spring
Our native bluebells are a common indicator species for ancient woodland and underneath the newly forming leaf canopy, filling the air with a faint and heady, honey smell, they are the 'May Magnificat' of the poet Gerald Manley Hopkins. The walk through woodlands in search of their arrival is very much a rite of spring, the bluebell is a symbol of constancy and in folklore they are the 'fairy bells' that ring out to call the fairies together.
Sharing the Skyline
Sharing the Skyline
From the edge of Red Brook on the plateau of Kinder Scout, the expansive skyline from wilderness to city and from mountain to plain is both awesome and inspirational. It is a contrast that appears to emphasise the divide between two different habitats and yet highlights their coexistence; the dramatic wild moorland landscape and the distant town sharing the skyline.
The Approach to Great Langdale
The Approach to Great Langdale
The remarkable road south of Ambleside, through Skelwith Bridge and Elterwater to Great Langdale and the Langdale Pikes is one of the classic rural roads; picturesque, atmospheric and enticing. Wainwright described the pikes as ‘once seen, never forgotten’ and indeed, theLangdale Pikes have a sense of spirit of place that is both ancient and almost tangible.
Lord's Bridge
Lord's Bridge
The early 19th Century herringbone stone bridge that spans the River Churnet near to Dimmings Dale, Oakamoor in Staffordshire is distinct and beautiful. Time and nature have unified the structure with the surrounding landscape, giving it an idyllic fairytale-like quality; it has a commanding sense of presence and effortless tranquillity as it straddles the flowing water.
The Pure Morning
The Pure Morning
Sorry the limited edition is now SOLD OUT
A wakening winter morning calm and pure, and as the moon slowly softens against the lightening sky, a solitary tree and fragments of ancient dry stone wall emerge from silhouette. Close to the megalithic burial chamber of Five Wells in Derbyshire, the sense of presence is powerful and the natural simplicity of the image conveys nothing more than the period of transition between night and day, the light and the moment.
The Way Through the Woods
The Way Through the Woods
The top of Monk's Dale, nestled between Wormhill and Tideswell, Derbyshire, is a rock-strewn and densely overgrown scramble of a dale where lush and luminous green moss clings to branches and the ancient remains of limestone walls. The way through the woods is both tricky and atmospheric, twisting through branches and boulders in an enclosed and eerie half-light. The title of the image is borrowed from the wonderful Rudyard Kipling poem.
Woodland Veins
Woodland Veins
Intertwining branches of late winter ivy thread like veins over the bark of an old oak tree and the magnificent colours of the wintering leaves lend a Pre-Raphaelite air to the scene. There’s something both magical and beautiful about the creeping, structural patterns as the vines wind inexorably upwards towards the light.
One Autumnal Face
One Autumnal Face
As October gives way to November and the leaves release their grasp, the colourful autumn freefall is a joy undimmed by the coming winter it heralds. The picture was taken at the delightful Tarn Hows in the Lake District and the title is borrowed from Elegy IX: The Autumnal by the metaphysical poet John Donne (1572 – 1631) – “No spring nor summer beauty hath such grace, As I have seen in one autumnal face.”
Threads
Threads
An isolated oak tree nestles in its seemingly precarious foothold, an outcrop of rocks high above Cluse Hay on the boundary of Lyme Park close to the Cheshire/Derbyshire border. The late autumn sun illuminates the threads of paths and trails that stretch out across the hills and valleys into the heart of the Peak District.
Midwinter
Midwinter
At the woodland edge, light penetrates the winter mist creating monochromatic silhouettes, illuminating the lying snow and fashioning a sense of movement within the evocative and compelling stillness. Midwinter light transcends mere bleakness, combining both tranquillity and mystery.
A Drift of Autumn Leaves
A Drift of Autumn Leaves
In the heart of the Peak District National Park, the hidden valleys, pathways, streams and secret waterfalls of the Goyt Valley create a seemingly endless web of landscape that transforms magically with the changing seasons. These drifting autumn leaves were momentarily sheltered at the base of thickly mossed rocks before being dispersed by the tumbling peaty waters that snake down the wooded slopes of Shooter's Clough.
That Which Lies Unseen
That Which Lies Unseen
Late afternoon on the last day of November and a thick and slow Lancashire mist shrouds the River Douglas, Fairy Glen and the valley below Parbold Hill. The relationship between what is seen and that which lies unseen, the dense and rolling tides of mist and the partial silhouettes, is as intriguing as it is beautiful.
Litton Walls
Litton Walls
The old village of Litton near to Tideswell in Derbyshire, is surrounded by the geometric patterns of ancient walled enclosures. At the head of Tansley Dale, in a landscape simplified by snow, a solitary tree is bounded by these strong, defining walls.
Frozen Falls
Frozen Falls
Tumbling from the plateau on the northern edge of Kinder Scout, the picturesque Fair Brook descends in a succession of cascades and waterfalls towards the Woodlands valley and its meeting with the River Ashop. Dressed by the winter cold, the lying snow and drapes of icicles transform the natural charm of this rugged boulder-strewn landscape into serene and magical chandeliers of ice.
Kinder Slopes
Kinder Slopes
This dramatic and evocative view of low swirling cloud and mist on Kinder Scout and the Kinder Plateau was taken from the top of Fair Brook Clough looking towards Hope Forest and the Snake Pass (A57). The Kinder wilderness is rugged and relentless and to describe this northern landscape as ‘gritty’ is a literal truth, but the upland gritstone plateau of Kinder has a compelling natural magic that is both powerful and unmistakeable and draws its visitors to return like pilgrims.
Shrouded Trees
Shrouded Trees
Enshrouding the trees and drifting between the branches, the remnants of the early morning mist are starkly illuminated by the strongly defined directional rays of the rising winter sun. Taken on the edge of the Hope Valley, near to Castleton in Derbyshire, the picture captures the eerie and beautiful quality of the early winter light.
The Road Due West
The Road Due West
On a January evening near to Hartington in Derbyshire, the wash of the drifting mist accentuates the rich and painterly colours of the winter sky. As the old road skirts the trees and winds away towards the far setting sun, ‘The Road Due West' captures something that is quintessentially 'Derbyshire'.
Sleeping Harbour
Sleeping Harbour
Sleeping Harbour' was captured on a late spring evening at Port Erin (Port Chiarn) on the Isle of Man. Dominated by Bradda Head and the striking silhouette of Milner's Tower, the quality of the light in this beautiful sweep of blue, lagoon-like bay are a famed and ever-changing source of wonder and delight. The scene and rich colouration combine to create an image that is atmospheric, languid and almost hypnotic.
The Dark Peak
The Dark Peak
The ‘Divine Light’ of crepuscular rays can occur when objects such as mountain peaks or clouds partially shadow the sun’s rays and airborne compounds scatter the sunlight making the rays visible due to diffraction, reflection and scattering. Appearing to radiate from a given point in the sky and streaming through gaps in the clouds, they are a wonderful phenomenon to observe. They were caught here on a moody, late winter afternoon near to the mysterious Mermaid’s Pool on the slopes of Kinder Scout, in the dark peak.
The Cave in Wolfscote Dale
The Cave in Wolfscote Dale
In Wolfscote Dale, just across the River Dove from Gipsy Bank, the worn and smooth rocks at the entrance of an ancient cave frame a typical and spectacular view of the almost vertical outcrops and rocky pinnacles of this Derbyshire gem. According to legend, it was close to this location that the last of the wolves that once roamed freely in this beautiful area was killed.
Black Cloughs of Bleaklow
Black Cloughs of Bleaklow
The dark, forbidding hulk of Bleaklow often lives up to its name. Wainwright described it as "an inhospitable wilderness of peat bogs over which progress on foot is very arduous. Nobody loves Bleaklow. All who get on it are glad to get off". But this is a harsh synopsis for Bleaklow has moments of absolute splendour and, on a fine day, fabulous views. At its eastern end, the three Black Cloughs (Near Black Clough, Middle Black Clough and Far Black Clough) cut deep gashes into the landscape and join together to tumble over boulders through birch woodland, the experience belies that bleakness.
Earth Gives Way to Sky
Earth Gives Way to Sky
Where earth gives way to sky, the upland landscape of Kinder Scout in the Peak District of Derbyshire has a tangible sense of isolation found in few other places. The iconic mountain of the Dark Peak, frequently battered by wind and rain and wrapped in shrouds of mist is ringed by a sky that can turn to menace without warning. The cloud-scraping emptiness of this windswept peak of peat bog is a bleak yet endlessly engaging wilderness.
Summer Portrait
Summer Portrait
From a good half-mile away, a single pinprick of red appeared like a stark apostrophe on the Cheshire landscape. Standing alone in the middle of a field, the poppy had a proud and almost magnetic presence, a summer portrait set against the backdrop of meadow and sky. Poppies are symbolic of peace, sleep, memories and remembrance.

ORDERING INFORMATION


Framed print of ‘Seven Rays' shown here for purposes of scale.


All of my landscape photography prints are hand prepared and limited to a single edition of 25 individually signed, numbered and certificated fully-archival fine art giclée prints. Each print is produced to order in my studio on museum quality Rag Paper using light-fast inks to guarantee a lifetime of display without fading or deteriorating. Rag Paper is 100% cotton fine art paper with a smooth and completely matt finish and guarantees the highest possible fidelity and quality.

Prints are 22.25" x 16.25" (56.5cm x 41.275cm) in size and each is individually prepared to order and supplied in a professional bespoke black aluminium gallery frame with a stylish V-groove internal mount. The Frame size is approx
30" x 24" (76cm x 61cm) and the prints are hand-titled on the left and individually signed and numbered on the right. The turnaround time on framed prints is normally 10 days. The price of fully framed prints is £245. Please contact me direct to place or discuss an order. All Major Credit and Debit Cards accepted.

As all of my landscape photography images are limited to just 25 signed and numbered fine art archival prints, I cannot guarantee that those featured in the Gallery Section of this website are still available. Please contact me by telephone or email to discuss availability of any images you are interested in purchasing.

Private viewing of my landscape photography work is possible by prior arrangement. Please contact me for details.


CONTACT INFORMATION

I am based in the Heaton Moor area of Stockport, Greater Manchester and am happy to deliver prints within the local area. You are also welcome to collect your orders in person. Please note that print orders requiring shipping will be sent unglazed.

 

 

Phone:  078 5591 3983

Email:  info@photolandscape.co.uk

 

 


John Eastwood
Landscape Photographer

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